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The Black Stallion by Walter Farley

Contributed by cassandra chambliss on Mar 8th, 2016. Artwork published in .
    tumblr_m9vx36k60G1qkoatso1_1280.jpg
    Source: http://horseheaven.tumblr.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Iconic title of Walter Farley’s series, The Black Stallion. This edition of the first eponymous book in the series was “published November 12th 1977 by Random House Books for Young Readers.” (Goodreads, ISBN: 039483609X. ISBN13: 9780394836096) The book was originally published in 1941 with different cover art, and multiple editions were issued before and after this particular design was used. More than 20 books in the series feature this title style.

    601e863d57555961f77833b61900b379.jpg
    Source: https://www.pinterest.com License: All Rights Reserved.
    il_fullxfull.674697027_li9k.jpg
    Source: https://www.etsy.com License: All Rights Reserved.
    son of the black stallion.jpg
    License: All Rights Reserved.
    the black stallions ghost--1978 cover2.jpg
    License: All Rights Reserved.

    Typefaces

    • Revue
    • Bookman

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    2 Comments on “The Black Stallion by Walter Farley”

    1. Mar 8th, 2016  10:00 am

      This version of Bookman is the one that Mark Simonson calls “Sixties Bookman”, see the specimen pdf for his Bookmania. By 1970, this uncredited design was the most ubiquitous Bookman.

      Letraset Revue came with a descending alternate ‘S’, but it doesn’t have the returning loop that is present here. The descending ‘k’ is most likely customized. So are other details like the length of the ‘t’ bar.

    2. Mar 8th, 2016  10:12 pm

      Thanks for the details about Revue! With so many books coming out in this series over a period of years, that font was an integral part of the texture of childhood for a generation of readers.

      Mark Simonson’s reference to Sixties Bookman was the closest I could get to identifying this one, but I wasn’t sure. I’m happy the search led me to Bookmania, and I enjoyed his thoughtful notes about its development.

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